Category Archives: Libertarian Labyrinth

Archive Adjustments

Time passes, and projects that were serving some useful purpose in the larger work no longer seem so vital. The various archives in the Libertarian Labyrinth are no exception to this rule. So, after one of my periodical reassessments, several archival projects are merging with others.

As I have noted in the past, the Labyrinth has always been a bit like leaving my file cabinets open on the internet–a working archive, rather than a formal exhibit, with all of the problems and untidiness you might expect from such a project. But it has allowed me to share a large amount of material with those ready and willing to connect the dots themselves or put that material to uses of their own.

Recently, however, I have felt like perhaps it was time to take on the task of providing some more focused introductory exhibits. These new changes are a step on the road to that goal.


The Nettlau Project, the Fourier archive at Possible and Impossible Worlds and Responsibility, Solidarity, Strategy are all becoming part of Anarchist Beginnings.

The Beautiful Nihilist is becoming part of St.-Ravachol.

The other material from Possible and Impossible Worlds has been backed up at A Quiet Crossroads, where it joins material from my beer blog, Well-Aged and Slightly Bitter (with Just a Touch of Funk.)

The Great Atercratic Revolution will become an occasional feature at Contr’un.

The Good Louise project will appear on La Frondeuse, someday…

The Corvus Editions site, which had generated a great deal more in internet attacks than it every did in commerce, has simply folded up short for the time being.

The Collective Reason translating wiki is now officially gone, although much of the material moved to the Proudhon Library wiki some time ago. The Libertarian Labyrinth wiki is slated to finally disappear as soon as I can make sure that everything there now is archived elsewhere. But that might take a while.

In a future phase, Mutualism.info is likely to merge into the Anarchist Beginnings project.

Obviously, these changes mean a broadening in scope of a couple of projects. Anarchist Beginnings is gradually evolving into the “Intro to Anarchist History” site that I never felt quite qualified to assemble. And the Anarchy & the Sex Question archive is expanding from a sole focus on Emma Goldman and Mother Earth to include a substantial amount of related material by and about Voltairine de Cleyre and Lizzie M. Holmes.

This may mean some minor inconvenience, for which I apologize, as adjustments are made, but I think the improvements will far outweigh the problems created. And if you’re looking for something that you really think ought to be somewhere in the archive, but doesn’t seem to be, you might simply try searching here on Contr’un, where I have quietly backed up a number of the minor sites that have disappeared.

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The Impact of the Cost Principle (and Archive Upgrades, VII)

It’s been sort of a hard week to stay on task, with constant new developments in the Occupy movement and multiple live streams to follow. I’ve also been approached, out of the blue, to collaborate on a Charles Fourier translation that sounds like enough fun to shuffle some things to make room for it in my workflow. As it happens, more of a focus on Fourier will undoubtedly help with projects like Dejacque’s Humanisphere and Proudhon’s Creation of Order, so I’m grateful for the distraction.

And work on the archive is still moving right along. I’m at about 525 COinS-equipped entries, and I’m seeing that a lot of articles from The Radical Review and Liberty are already transcribed, which will speed things up as I turn most of my attention to the Tucker archive project. New additions are not a top priority at the moment, but they always seem to turn up if I do any research at all—and I’m always doing at least some research. If nothing else, completing citations has me searching archives constantly, and, as I’ve mentioned before, sometime even failed searches bring new successes.

Late last night, for example, I ran across an interesting news article from The Kansas Herald of Freedom, which describes an early trades-education experiment, which resembles Josiah Warren’s school at Spring Hill, Ohio. There’s probably good reason for that, as the article declares one of the goals of the school to be “to make cost the limit of price.” It has become gradually more and more obvious to me that, if individualist anarchism never had a “mass” impact, it certainly did have a hard-to-measure impact on a wide range of small experiments. Here’s one of them:

Education.  
Henry Hiatt and others, living in the vicinity of Bloomington, have made a beginning for a Manual Labor School. It is intended to introduce a new principle: that is, to make cost the limit of price,—to arrange so that indigent young men, as well as the wealthy, can obtain a liberal education; that teachers, as well as pupils, shall labor a part of each day for their health and daily bread; that after buildings are erected and the land brought under cultivation, enough shall be produced on the domain to supply the current demands of both pupils and teachers.  
On the old system of education, multitudes of young men are unable to attend the schools and colleges, principally on account of the expense of boarding. While the tuition is not over from twenty to fifty dollars per year, boarding amounts to five times that sum. The Manual Labor School meets this contingency. The expense of boarding can be met every day by three hours’ labor, and as much time as usual devoted to study. Cheap tenements can be erected also in the vicinity, where those living near by can board themselves, bringing their provisions from home.  
For further particulars, address Henry Hiatt, Bloomington, K. T.  
“Education,” The Kansas Herald of Freedom 2, no. 31 (February 28, 1857): 1. 
_________________________

And here’s another listing of newly updated articles. I’ve hyperlinked a letter by Lysander Spooner that was new to me:

Joseph H. Allen, “Current Literature—The Principles of Sociology. By Herbert Spencer,” The Radical Review 1, no. 2 (August 1877): 352.
William Bailie, “Problems of Anarchism: Introduction, 1. Social and Individual Liberty,” Liberty 1, no. 19 (April 1916): 1.
Alexander Berkman, “Prisons and Crime,” Mother Earth 1, no. 6 (August 1906): 23-29.
Warren Edwin Brokaw, “The Only Unpardonable Sin,” The Pacific Monthly 15, no. 6 (June 1906): 763-767.
Warren Edwin Brokaw, “Who Should Possess the Wealth of the World?,” The North American Review214, no. 3 (September 1921): 431-432.
Steven T. Byington, “The Function of the Church,” The New Republic 27, no. 340 (June 8, 1921): 50.
Steven T. Byington, “Preventing Wires from Sinking into End-bars,” Gleanings in Bee Culture45, no. 1 (January 1917): 62-63.
William Henry Channing, “Prospectus for Volume II. of the Present,” The Present 1, no. 7-8 (January 15, 1844): 288.
I. Crane Clark, “Where is Robert Palmer?,” The Black Cat 9, no. 5 (February 1904): 19-24.
Henry Edger, “Prostitution and the International Woman’s League,” The Radical Review 1, no. 3 (November 1877): 397-418.
C. W. Ernst, “Practical Socialism in Germany,” The Radical Review 1, no. 1 (May 1877): 25-45.
W. B. G., “What Is the Minus Quantity?,” Massachusetts Teacher and Journal of Home and School Education 13, no. 9 (September 1860): 330-333.
Emma Goldman, “Preparedness, the Road to Universal Slaughter,” Mother Earth 10, no. 10 (December 1915): 331-338.
Bolton Hall, “The Fond Father,” Life 38, no. 977 (July 25, 1901): 68.
Bolton Hall, “The God of Evil,” The American Theosophist 15, no. ?? (n.d.): 712-714.
Bolton Hall, “The Good of Evil,” in International Metaphysical League, Proceedings of the 2d Annual Convention, Held at New York, N.Y., October 23-26, 1900 (Boston: International Metaphysical League, 1901).
Bolton Hall, “The Gospel Of Wealth,” Life38, no. 978 (August 1, 1901): 85.
Bolton Hall, “The Gospel Of Wealth,” The Independent 53, no. 2749 (August 8, 1901): 1869.
Bolton Hall, “The Gospel Of Wealth,” The Public 4, no. 185 (October 19, 1901): 442-443.
Bolton Hall, “Remedial Measures,” The Public 1, no. 51 (March 25, 1899): 12.
Edward Henry, “What is the Use in Building Laws? Wherein they are Useful—A Criticism,” Engineering Magazine 2, no. 2 (November 1891): 238-246.
Joshua King Ingalls, “The Grave of the Landless,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 8 (August 25, 1849): 113.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Profession,” Univercoelum and Spiritual Philosopher 2, no. 12 (August 19, 1848): 186.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Property and Its Rights,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 10 (September 8, 1849): 146-148.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Property and Its Rights,” The Journal of Progress 1, no. 11 (July 9, 1853): 1-3.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Property Rights in Debt and Contract,” The Twentieth Century 12, no. 15 (April 12, 1894): 8-9.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Protective Unions,” Univercoelum and Spiritual Philosopher4, no. 2 (June 9, 1849): 24-25.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Relation of Labor to Land,” Report of the Committee of the Senate upon the Relations between labor and Capital, 2nd ed. (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1885).
Joshua King Ingalls, “Relations, Existing and Natural, between Man and Property,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 16 (October 20, 1849): 243-246.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Relations, Existing and Natural, between Man and Property,” The Journal of Progress 1, no. 11 (July 9, 1853): 3.
Joshua King Ingalls, “What Is Economic Rent?,” The Twentieth Century 9, no. 26 (December 29, 1892): 6-8.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Who Will Be an Oberlin? Who Will Go to New Jersey?,” Universalist Union 8, no. 11 (January 28, 1843): 167.
Alan P. Kelly, “The Foundations of Trade,” Liberty 2, no. 24 (September 6, 1884): 4.
Peter Kropotkin, “The Fortress Prison of St. Petersburg,” The Nineteenth Century 13, no. 76 (June 1883): 928-949.
Marx Edgeworth Lazarus, “Political Liberalism,” Liberty 3, no. 18 (November 28, 1885): 5.
Marx Edgeworth Lazarus, “Rational Communism,” Liberty 4, no. 6 (July 17, 1886): 5. [review]
Marx Edgeworth Lazarus, “Relative Longevity of the Negro and Mulatto,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 23 (December 8, 1849): 355.
Marx Edgeworth Lazarus and Benjamin R. Tucker, “Rent: Parting Words,” Liberty 4, no. 19 (December 12, 1885): 3.
Marx Edgeworth Lazarus, “Whom to Kill?,” Liberty 3, no. 23 (February 6, 1886): 8.
Hughes Le Roux, and Benjamin R. Tucker (translator), “A Sheriff’s Sale in Paradise,” The Freethinker 10, no. 4 (February 2, 1890): 57-58.
J. William Lloyd, “Plumb-Centre,” Liberty 4, no. 4 (June 19, 1886): 1.
Dyer D. Lum, “Prognostications,” The Index 6, no. 296 (September 9, 1875): 429.
Errico Malatesta, “Pro-Government Anarchists,” Freedom 30, no. 324 (April 1916): 28.
Lewis Masquerier, “Progressive and Rotary Motion,” in American Institute of the City of New York, Transactions of the American Institute of the City of New York, for the Years 1860-61 (Albany, NY: C. Van Benthuysen, 1861): 576-578.
Lewis Masquerier, “Propagandists,” The Boston Investigator 32, no. 35 (December 31, 1862): 275.
Sidney H. Morse, “Political Evolution,” Liberty 3, no. 14 (September 12, 1885): 4.
William C. Owen, “Proudhon Condensed,” Freedom 34, no. 369 (February 1920): 11.
J. Stahl Patterson, “Current Literature—The Religious Sentiment: Its Source and Aim. A Contribution to the Science and Philosophy of Religion. By D. G. Brinton,” The Radical Review 1, no. 3 (August 1877): 364-366.
John Beverley Robinson, “Why I Oppose Building Laws.—A Rejoinder,” Engineering Magazine 2, no. 2 (November 1891): 246-251.
Lysander Spooner and Joseph Barker, “Free Soil Inconsistency,” The Liberator 24, no. 8 (February 24, 1854): 31.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Moral Courage,” The Boston Investigator 43, no. 38 (January 14, 1874): 6.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Proudhon and Fraternity,” Liberty 5, no. 21 (May 26, 1888): 11.
Benjamin R. Tucker, Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, and Edmond Lepelletier, “Proudhon as a Dramatic Author,” Liberty 10, no. 23 (March 23, 1895): 4-8.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “What We Mean,” Liberty 1, no. 19 (April 15, 1882): 2-3.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Who Is the Somebody?,” Liberty 1, no. 1 (August 6, 1881): 3.
James L. Walker, “Proudhon’s Works a Source of Health,” Liberty 4, no. 6 (February 26, 1887): 1.
James L. Walker, “Regicides and Republicans,” Liberty 4, no. 11 (November 20, 1886): 5.
James L. Walker, “What is Justice?,” Liberty 3, no. 25 (March 6, 1886): 8.
Robert Dale Owen and Josiah Warren, “Printing in Private Families,” The Free Enquirer 2, no. 20 (March 13, 1830): 157.
John Weiss, “Preacher’s Love-Vacation,” The Radical Review 1, no. 3 (November 1877): 443-446.

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Archive upgrades, VI

Some days the archive work seems to go very slowly, despite the fact that I’m spending 40+ hours each week now doing very little but research, data entry, COinS generation and other tasks directly related to getting the Labyrinth archive straightened out and hammered into a more usable shape. And, ultimately, that’s coming along well enough that I can probably turn most of my attention towards the now-looming Benjamin R. Tucker archive project, and start puttering away at translations again. So here’s your archive update:

Max Baginski, “Without Government,” Mother Earth 1, no. 1 (March 1906): 20-26.
B. W. Ball, “To Benedict Spinosa,” The Radical Review 1, no. 1 (May 1877): 24.
I. G. Blanchard, “The Warfare,” The Radical Review 1, no. 3 (November 1877): 522.
Steven T. Byington, “Martin and Bee-Martin Very Different,” Gleanings in Bee Culture 44, no. 21 (November 1, 1916): 1038.
Steven T. Byington, “Non-Resistance; and Did Jesus Mean to Say that We Should Not Protect Ourselves as a People and as a Nation?,” Gleanings in Bee Culture 44, no. 5 (March 1, 1916): 213.
Steven T. Byington, “The Super-Spring Fixes It,” Gleanings in Bee Culture 44, no. 12 (June 15, 1916): 499.
William Henry Channing, “The State Agricultural Fair,” The Present 1, no. 2 (October 15, 1843): 68-70.
François Coignet, “The Ways and Means of Free Exchange and Credit.,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 6 (August 11, 1849): 81-82.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “To Strive and Fail,” Mother Earth 3, no. 9 (November 1908): 360-363.
Jean Deroin, “Woman—Her Position and Duties,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 2 (July 14, 1849): 27-28.
Jean Deroin, “Woman—Her Position and Duties,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 4 (July 28, 1849): 59.
Editor, “To Correspondents,” The Boston Investigator 19, no. 11 (July 18, 1849): 3.
Emily E. Ford, “To a Man about Town,” The Radical Review 1, no. 4 (February 1878): 688-689.
Jay Fox, “Trade Unionism and Anarchism,” Mother Earth 2, no. 9 (November 1907): 395-405.
Emma Goldman, “The Woman Suffrage Chameleon,” Mother Earth 12, no. 3 (May 1917): 78-80.
Covington Hall, “Why I am a Socialist,” The International Socialist Review 5, no. 6 (December 1904): 347.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Tolstoi on Henry George and Single Tax,” The Twentieth Century 20, no. 11 (March 12, 1898): 9-12.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Woman’s Industrial Subjection.—No. 1.—Its Origin,” The Woman’s Tribune ??, no. ?? (February 23, 1889): 82-??.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Woman’s Industrial Subjection.—No. 2.—Its Gradual Development Under Governments of Force,” The Woman’s Tribune ??, no. ?? (March 23, 1889): 114-115.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Woman’s Industrial Subjection.—No. 3.—In Relation to Land Ownership,” The Woman’s Tribune ??, no. ?? (April 20, 1889): 147.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Woman’s Industrial Subjection.—No. 4.—In Exchanges of Labor and its Product,” The Woman’s Tribune ??, no. ?? (May 18, 1889): 174.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Work and Wealth,” The Radical Review 1, no. 4 (February 1878): 650-660.
C. L. James, “The Subliminal Self,” Popular Science News 32, no. 12 (December 1898): 280.
Samuel Johnson, “Transcendentalism,” The Radical Review 1, no. 3 (November 1877): 447-478.
Peter Kropotkin, “The Sterilization of the Unfit,” Mother Earth 7, no. 10 (December 1912): 354-357.
[Announcement of ‘The Wife of Number 4,237’], Liberty 3, no. 24 (February 20, 1886): 4.
Sophie Kropotkin, “The Wife of Number 4,237,” Liberty 3, no. 25 (March 6, 1886): 2-3.
Sophie Kropotkin, “The Wife of Number 4,237,” Liberty 3, no. 26 (March 27, 1886): 7.
Sophie Kropotkin, “The Wife of Number 4,237,” Liberty 4, no. 1 (April 17, 1886): 2-3.
Sophie Kropotkin, “The Wife of Number 4,237,” Liberty 4, no. 2 (May 1, 1886): 7.
Sophie Kropotkin, “The Wife of Number 4,237,” Liberty 4, no. 3 (May 22, 1886): 3.
Marx Edgeworth Lazarus, “To the Radical Review,” Liberty 2, no. 44 (June 14, 1884): 8.
Marx Edgeworth Lazarus, “Too Much Devotion,” Liberty 4, no. 5 (July 3, 1886): 7.
sJ. William Lloyd, “The World’s Future—A Prophecy,” The Phrenological Journal and Science of Health 75, no. 4 (October 1882): 180-183.
Edwin Markham, “To Louise Michel,” The Man with the Hoe (New York: Doubleday and McClure, 1899): 65.
Lewis Masquerier, “To Robert Owen,” The Crisis, and National Co-Operative Trades’ Union Gazette 4, no. 13 (July 5, 1834): 99-100.
“[Response]” The Crisis, and National Co-Operative Trades’ Union Gazette 4, no. 15 (July 19, 1834): 118.
Hugh O. Pentecost, “The Crime of Capital Punishment,” The Arena 1, no. 2 (January 1890): 175-183.
Hugh O. Pentecost, “The Tap-Root of Industrial Discontent,” Engineering Magazine 1, no. 4 (July 1891): 498-504.
John Beverley Robinson, “What is the Use of a Building Law?,” Engineering Magazine 1, no. 5 (August 1891): 656-662.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “The State Its Own Outlaw,” Liberty 1, no. 16 (March 4, 1882): 2.
John Turner, “The Struggle in England,” The Rebel 1, no. 1 (September 20, 1895): 6.
William Henry Van Ornum, “The Study and Needs of Sociology,” The Arena 24, no. 3 (September 1900): 328-336.
“An Investigator” [Josiah Warren?], “The ‘Rappings’,” The Boston Investigator 20, no. 51 (April 23, 1851): 1.
Josiah Warren, “To the Friends of the Equal Exchange of Labor in the West,” The Free Enquirer 23, no. 38 (July 17, 1830): 301-302.
Josiah Warren, “Written on Hearing of the Death of Camilla Wright,” The Free Enquirer 5, no. 18 (February 23, 1833): 144.
David A. Wasson, “Theodore Parker as Religious Reformer,” The Radical Review 1, no. 1 (May 1877): 46-73.
J. W, “The Word is the Ark,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 17 (October 27, 1849): 267-268.
“The Stores of Protective Unions and Workingmen,” Merchants’ Magazine and Commercial Review 35, no. 1 (July 1856): 133-134.
“To Correspondents,” The Boston Investigator 20, no. 48 (April 2, 1851): 3.
William Henry Channing, “Victor Considerant,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 6 (August 11, 1949): 89-90.
Bjorkman Maulk Frances, “Vive le Roi,” Mother Earth 1, no. 1 (March 1906): 27.
Emma Goldman, “Victims of Morality,” Mother Earth 8, no. 1 (March 1913): 19-24.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Uprightness the Only Path to Safety,” Univercoelum and Spiritual Philosopher 3, no. 13 (February 24, 1849): 193-195.
Marx Edgeworth Lazarus, “True Principles of Emancipation,” The Dial 1, no. 4 (April 1860): 219-228.
Pierre Leroux and W. C. R. (translator), “Universal Regeneration,” The Present 1, no. 7-8 (January 15, 1844): 237-242.
Dyer D. Lum, “Wendell Phillips’s Grave,” Liberty 3, no. 11 (June 20, 1885): 1.
Joseph B. Marvin, “Walt Whitman,” The Radical Review 1, no. 2 (August 1877): 224-259.
Grace Potter, “Try Love,” Mother Earth 1, no. 1 (March 1906): 18-19.
James L. Walker, “Truth and Belief,” Liberty 4, no. 17 (March 12, 1887): 7.
Charles Erskine Scott Wood, “Transmutation of Virtues into Vices,” The Pacific Monthly 20, no. 4 (October 1908): 454-455.
Charles Erskine Scott Wood, “Transmutation of Virtues into Vices,” Journal of the Switchmen’s Union 11, no. 2 (December 1908): 911-913.
“Was Proudhon a Hypocrite?,” Liberty 5, no. 22 (June 9, 1888): 7.

 

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Archive upgrades, V

There’s no escaping the fact that some of what is necessary in this process of turning my online filing cabinet into a working archive is pretty slow going, and pretty dull stuff. That’s undoubtedly apparent to readers who see dump after dump of bibliographic listings without necessarily seeing much change in the Libertarian Labyrinth itself. But there’s a kind of geometric progression involved in the transformation of data into information, and more and more often now I’m finding that when I consult my various sources for something simple, like a volume or page number, I’m coming back with completely new articles. The recent Eliphalet Kimball finds were actually the result of a failed bibliographic reference search. And while I was dotting i‘s and crossing t‘s on those, I ran across what may be a fairly significant, and pseudonymous, Josiah Warren article. Anyway, the 1873 Kimball article pushed the number of standardized entries in the archive up to 400. And here’s another update:

Francis E. Abbott, “Casting the Horoscope,” The Index 6, no. 298 (September 9, 1875): 426-427.
Stephen Pearl Andrews, Constitution or Organic Basis of the Pantarchy (New York: Baker & Godwin, printers, 1860).
Michael Bakunin, “Bourgeois Socialism,” Freedom 29, no. 310 (February 1915): 11.
Charles W. Buck, “Current Literature—The Cradle of the Christ,” The Radical Review 1, no. 4 (February 1878): 797-801.
Steven T. Byington, “Cucumber-Spraying that is Harmless to Bees,” Gleanings in Bee Culture 42, no. 20 (October 15, 1914): 809-810.
William Henry Channing, “Call of the Present.—No. 1.—Social Reorganization,” The Present 1, no. 2 (October 15, 1843): 37-44.
William Henry Channing, “Call of the Present.—No. 2.—Science of Unity,” The Present 1, no. 3 (November 15, 1843): 73-80.
William Henry Channing, “Call of the Present.—No. 3.—Oneness of God and Man,” The Present 1, no. 5-6 (December 15, 1843): 145-155.
William Henry Channing, “Christian Socialists,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 1 (July 7, 1849): 8-10.
William Henry Channing, “Charles Fourier,” The Present 1, no. 1 (September 1843): 28-29.
G. K. Chesterton, “The Trumpet,” Mother Earth 2, no. 12 (February 1908): 562-565.
Willard Cross, “Rights and Wrongs,” To-Morrow 3, no. 2 (February 1907): 70-71.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Triumph of Youth,” Mother Earth 1, no. 6 (August 1906): 55-62.
John Fiske, “Chauncey Wright,” The Radical Review 1, no. 4 (February 1878): 690-706.
Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman, “Bolsheviks Shooting Anarchists,” Freedom 36, no. 391 (January 1922): 4.
Emma Goldman, “Donald Vose: The Accursed,” Mother Earth 10, no. 11 (January 1916): 353-357.
Bolton Hall, “Cabled from Portugal,” The Public 1, no. 37 (December 17, 1898): 13.
Bolton Hall, Louis F. Post, and Jackson H. Ralston, “The Trust and the Single Tax,” The Arena 26, no. 4 (October 1901): 363-372.
Sadakichi Hartmann, “Dispossessed,” Mother Earth 2, no. 1 (March 1907): 56-58.
Hippolyte Havel, “Deeds of Violence,” Mother Earth 5, no. 8 (October 1910): 248-250.
A. T. Heist, “Chattel and Wage Slavery,” Mother Earth 2, no. 4 (June 1907): 192-194.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Books—Their Sphere and Influence,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 24 (December 15, 1849): 369-371.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Building Associations,” Univercoelum and Spiritual Philosopher 4, no. 5 (June 30, 1849): 72-73.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Can Economic Factors Be Exchanged?,” The Twentieth Century 12, no. 1 (January 4, 1894): 8-9.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Capital and Association,” Univercoelum and Spiritual Philosopher 2, no. 23 (November 4, 1848): 362.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Capital and Labor,” The Journal of Progress 1, no. 6 (June 4, 1853): 85-86.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Capital and Labor,” The Journal of Progress 1, no. 7 (June 11, 1853): 100-101.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Conference at Huntington, L. I.,” Universalist Union 7, no. 32 (June 25, 1842): 500-501.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Correspondence—Paper Money,” The Twentieth Century 11, no. ?? (September 14, 1893): 14.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Creed,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 1 (July 15, 1849): 11-12.
Joshua King Ingalls, The Unrevealed Religion (Sioux City, Iowa: Fair Play Publishing Co., 1891).
Joshua King Ingalls, “The Wage Question,” The American Socialist 2, no. 38 (September 20, 1877): 298.
C. L. James, “Do You See the Point?,” Machinists’ Monthly Journal 14, no. 10 (October 1902): 667.
Eliphalet Kimball, “Law, Commerce, and Religion,” The Boston Investigator 32, no. 13 (June 30, 1862): 97-98.
Eliphalet Kimball, “Reminiscences,” The Boston Investigator 32, no. 26 (October 29, 1862): 105.
“Necrology.—Eliphalet Kimball, Hartford, Ct.,” The Daily Picayune (New Orleans) 53, no. 348 (January 7, 1890): 1.
Peter Kropotkin, “Brain Work and Manual Work,” The Nineteenth Century 29, no. 157 (March 1890): 456-475.
Peter Kropotkin, “Brain Work and Manual Work,” Mother Earth 1, no. 4 (June 1906): 21-30. [edited reprint]
Eliphalet Kimball, “Capital, Labor, Natural Government,” The Boston Investigator 42, no. 45 (March 5, 1873): 1.
Herman Kuehn, “Compulsion?,” To-Morrow 3, no. 3 (March 1907): 70-71.
Herman Kuehn, “Compulsion Fails,” To-Morrow 3, no. 3 (March 1907): 73.
Herman Kuehn, “Ideals,” To-Morrow 3, no. 3 (March 1907): 56. (poem)
Herman Kuehn, “The Negro’s Right to Rule,” To-Morrow 3, no. 2 (February 1907): 41-43.
Herman Kuehn, “The Triumphs of Peace,” To-Morrow 3, no. 2 (February 1907): 70.
Joseph Labadie, “Can One Man Earn a Million Dollars?,” The Railroad Telegrapher 18, no. 9 (September 1901): 814-815.
Pierre Leroux, “Charity, as the Remedy of Evil,” The Present 1, no. 5-6 (December 15, 1843): 201-205.
Pierre Leroux and Orestes A. Brownson (translator), “Berkeley and Idealism,” Brownson’s Quarterly Review 1, no. 1 (January 1844): 29-56.
J. William Lloyd, “The True Basis of Individualism,” Liberty 6, no. 20 (September 7, 1889): 6-7.
Dyer D. Lum, “Buddhism Notwithstanding,” The Index 6, no. 279 (April 29, 1875): 194-196.
Dyer D. Lum, “Buddhism Notwithstanding,” The Index 6, no. 280 (May 6, 1875): 206-208.
Dyer D. Lum, “Christian Socialism,” Liberty 3, no. 18 (November 28, 1885): 5.
Dyer D. Lum, “Current Literature—The Conflict between Labor and Capital,” The Radical Review 1, no. 4 (February 1878): 786-789.
Lewis Masquerier, “The Universal Community Society of Rational Religionists,” The Boston Investigator 9, no. 39 (December 4, 1839): 1.
New England Labor Reform League, Declaration of Sentiments and Constitution of the New-England Labor-Reform League (Boston: The League, 1869).
William J. Potter, “The Two Traditions, Ecclesiastical and Scientific,” The Radical Review 1, no. 1 (May 1877): 1-24.
Philip Rappaport, “Individualism and Socialism,” To-Morrow 3, no. 2 (February 1907): 44-48.
Ellis Roberts, “In Memoriam: Louise Michel,” Poems (London: Brimley Johnson & Ince, Ltd., 1906): 65-66.
Clarence Lee Swartz, “Bailie’s Book on Warren,” Liberty 14, no. 26 (May 1905): 2.
Francis D. Tandy, “Biology and Sociology,” The Twentieth Century, May 14, 1891, 7.
Paul Verlaine, “Ballade en l’Honneur de Louise Michel,” Amour (Paris: Leon Vanier, 1892): 65-66.
Josiah Warren, “Criticism,” The Word 1, no. 2 (June 1872): 3.
“Death of Estella Bachman Brokaw,” Single Tax Review 10, no. 4 (July 1910): 28.
 “Louise Michel—A Radical Disappointment,” Moonshine 7, no. 3 (January 20, 1882): 33.

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Archive upgrades, IV

The week was full of the right kinds of interruptions: A couple of research requests I had out bore fruit, and gave me plenty of productive distractions from the ongoing archive clean-up. Barry Pateman, of Kate Sharpley Library, hooked me up with a file of old card catalog data for Mother Earth, which I’ve started to transcribe and integrate into the archive. I got a chance to talk through some difficult points of the “Essence of Mutualism” article that I’ve been working on with a knowledgeable drinking buddy. And a couple more Benjamin Tucker-related sources turned out to be a lot easier to access than I had imagined. Oh, yeah… I also found that I had scanned over 2000 pages of The Twentieth Century in the hectic final days in Ohio, and then tucked it away online (and pretty well forgot about it) when the project was interrupted by technical difficulties. It’s not the sexiest 2000 pages in the run, but it is the part I would least like to have to wrestle with again.

It’s nice to be a little snowed under with hot research leads at the moment, working 10 or 12 hours a day on various aspects of various projects, and sleeping when I get around to it. It’s particularly nice that so much of what I’m finding right now confirms my summer thought that completing the Benjamin Tucker archive might be a fine way to build the spine—or at least a first support—for a broader collection of resources relating to anarchism and intellectual history. So I’ve finally talked myself into doing just that, returning to the transcription of Liberty and the Radical Review, and giving it the full two years of part-time work that it will really require—assuming I can find the steady trickle of support that the project will require. After a couple of weeks of careful calculating, I’m at the stage where most of the basics necessary to make the project sustainable and successful seem pretty clear, so if my nerves hold I’ll be starting to lay that stuff out over the next couple of weeks.

In the meantime, here’s a small selection of the new or newly standardized texts in the Libertarian Labyrinth archive, including a few real gems:

Leonard D. Abbott, “An Impression of Maxim Gorky,” Mother Earth 3, no. 1 (March 1908): 32-34.
Leonard D. Abbott, “Some Reminiscences of Ernest Crosby,” Mother Earth 1, no. 12 (February 1907): 22-27.
Anarchist Federation of New York, “The Anarchist Federation of New York: Monthly Report,” Mother Earth 2, no. 12 (February 1908): 582-583.
Anarchist Federation of New York, “To the Anarchists of America,” Mother Earth 2, no. 11 (January 1908): 533-534.
J. A. Andrews, “The Day of Rebellion,” Mother Earth 1, no. 8 (October 1906): 10.
E. Armand, “The Great Debacle,” Mother Earth 10, no. 1 (March 1915): 431-434.
E. Armand, “What We Have Been, We Still Remain,” Mother Earth 10, no. 7 (September 1915): 229-232.
Steven T. Byington, “On Behalf of Ideas,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 13 (December 15, 1913): 258-259.
Steven T. Byington, “On Interference with the Environment,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 7 (September 15, 1913): 121-123.
Steven T. Byington, “On Interference with the Environment,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 8 (October 1, 1913): 146-147.
Steven T. Byington, “On Interference with the Environment,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 9 (October 15, 1913): 167-168.
Steven T. Byington, “Syndicalist Prostitution,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 9 (October 15, 1913): 176.
Steven T. Byington, “On Interference with the Environment,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 10 (November 1, 1913): 186-187.
Steven T. Byington, “On Interference with the Environment,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 11 (November 15, 1913): 206-207.
Steven T. Byington, “On Interference with the Environment,” The Egoist 1, no. 1 (January 1, 1914): 15-16.
Steven T. Byington, “On Interference with the Environment,” The Egoist 1, no. 2 (January 15, 1914): 34-35.
Ernest Howard Crosby, “Laymen’s Criticisms of the Church,” Homiletic Review 30, no. 1 (July 1895): 26-27.
Ernest Howard Crosby, “Tolstoy, Mystic and Realist,” Mind 12, no. 3 (June 1903): 161-165.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Case in Philadelphia,” Mother Earth 3, no. 1 (March 1908): 41-42.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Feast of Belshazzar,” Mother Earth 9, no. 1 (March 1914): 4.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Paris Commune,” Mother Earth 9, no. 1 (March 1914): 14-20.
Emma Goldman, “Adventures in the Desert of American Liberty,” Mother Earth 4, no. 9 (November 1909): 292-297.
Emma Goldman, “Among Barbarians,” Mother Earth 1, no. 12 (February 1907): 10-11.
Emma Goldman, “The End of the Odyssey,” Mother Earth 4, no. 2 (April 1909): 47-51.
Emma Goldman, “The End of the Odyssey,” Mother Earth 5, no. 5 (July 1910): 159-163.
Bolton Hall, “Book Review of ‘Individualism’ by Professor Warner Fite,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 6 (September 1, 1913): 117-118.
Bolton Hall, “Graveyard Fruit,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 10 (November 1, 1913): 195-196.
Ben L. Reitman, “A Visit to London,” Mother Earth 5, no. 8 (October 1910): 250-254.
John Beverley Robinson, “Egoism,” Freedom 38, no. 414 (January 1924): 3.
“Death of John Beverley Robinson,” Freedom 38, no. 414 (January 1924): 6.
Charles Brodie Patterson, “Ernest Howard Crosby: A Biographical Sketch,” Mind 12, no. 3 (June 1903): 166-171.
Clarence Lee Swartz, “The Claims of Women,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 5 (August 15, 1913): 96-97.
Clarence Lee Swartz, “An American Comment,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 9 (October 15, 1913): 178-179.
Clarence Lee Swartz, “An Epidemic of Law,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 12 (December 1, 1913): 225-226.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Has Had a Similar Experience,” Printers’ Ink 6, no. 6 (February 10, 1892): 187-188.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Two Testaments,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1913): 15.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Diderot on Maidenly Education,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 2 (July 1, 1913): 37.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Does God Ever Think Twice?,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 2 (July 1, 1913): 37.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Paris Notes,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 3 (July 15, 1913): 48.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Paris Notes,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 4 (August 1, 1913): 72-74.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “The Latest Freaks of Taxation,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 5 (August 15, 1913): 94.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Possibilities of the Future,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 6 (September 1, 1913): 116.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Lego et Penso,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 6 (September 1, 1913): 115-116.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Lego et Penso,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 7 (September 15, 1913): 134.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Lego et Penso,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 8 (October 1, 1913): 156-157.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Lego et Penso,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 11 (November 15, 1913): 217-218.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Lego et Penso,” The New Freewoman 1, no. 13 (December 15, 1913): 254-255.

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Archive upgrades, III

The Libertarian Labyrinth clean-up advances, step by step: I’ve made it through the “A”s in a roughly linear fashion—with lots of side trips to deal with all the old problems, new listings and such that naturally appear. And I’ve been simultaneously digging out and organizing my paper files, which can be a little daunting, since my print-outs of Bolton Hall articles (mostly one-page parables) amount to a 5” stack all by themselves. Since I’m taking the time to verify citations with the original sources where I can, it’s been an opportunity to rapidly refresh my memory about a lot of aspects of my last ten years’ worth of research.

If you’re wading into the archive, you’ll find a lot of new author/bibliography pages and navigational templates. On the bibliographic pages, you’ll find entries in bold-face, and, in general, those entries should indicate articles that have COinS metadata attached, for those using reference-management systems.

And here’s another sample of what’s available:

Henry Addis, “Communism,” Freedom 32, no. 344 (January 1918): 2.
Max Baginski, “Anarchism and Anti-Militarism on Trial,” Mother Earth 2, no. 8 (October 1907): 329-333.
Samuel Butler, “Authority,” Mother Earth 1, no. 5 (July 1906): 4-5.
Steven T. Byington, “Anent those Poison Labels,” Good Housekeeping 45, no. 4 (October 1907): 419.
Stephen T. Byington, “Police Methods,” Mother Earth 2, no. 8 (October 1907): 333-335.
Steven T. Byington, “What We Find Instead of the Foot of the Rainbow,” Liberty 15, no. 1 (February 1906): 16-26.
E. C., “Communication,” The Free Enquirer 2, no. 42 (August 14, 1830): 322.
William Henry Channing, “Closing of the Volume,” The Present 1, no. 11-12 (April 1, 1844): 431-432.
Ernest Howard Crosby, “An Hour with Tolstoy,” Mind 11, no. 1 (June 1891): 66-72.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “At the End of the Alley,” Mother Earth 2, no. 2 (April 1907): 113-116.
C. W. Ernst, “Current Literature—A Collection of Philosophical Discourses,” The Radical Review 1, no. 2 (August 1877): 361-364.
Charles Fourier and Charles A. Dana (translator), “An Unpublished Fragment of Fourier,” The Harbinger 3, no. 10 (August 15, 1846): 150-151.
Emma Goldman, Anarchism: What It Really Stands For (New York: Mother Earth Publishing Association, 1911).
Emma Goldman, “Anarchy and the Sex Question,” The Alarm 4, no. 3 (September 27, 1896): 3.
Emma Goldman and John Most, “Anarchy Defended by Anarchists,” Metropolitan Magazine 4, no. 3 (October 1896).
Emma Goldman, Alexander Berkman, and Harry Kelly, “As to “Crammers of Furnaces”,” Mother Earth 1, no. 10 (December 1906): 21-24.
Emma Goldman, “The Child and Its Enemies,” Mother Earth 1, no. 2 (April 1906): 7-14.
Emma Goldman, “The Tragedy at Buffalo,” Mother Earth 1, no. 8 (October 1906): 11-16.
Emma Goldman, “The Tragedy of Woman’s Emancipation,” Mother Earth 1, no. 1 (March 1906): 9-18.
Margaret Grant, “An Interview with God,” Mother Earth 2, no. 7 (September 1907): 284-287.
Bolton Hall, “And You?,” Mother Earth 1, no. 1 (March 1906): 3.
Bolton Hall, “Competition—A Fable,” Commonwealth 6, no. 26-30 (July 1899): 18-20.
Bolton Hall, “A Fable for Workingmen,” To-Morrow 2, no. 7 (July 1906): 67.
Bolton Hall, “The Ones Interested,” Mother Earth 1, no. 10 (December 1906): 5.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Another Renunciation,” Universalist Union 8, no. 52 (November 11, 1843): 829-831.  
Joshua King Ingalls, “Competition,” Univercoelum and Spiritual Philosopher 2, no. 16 (August 16, 1848): 249-250.
Harry Kelly, “Anarchism—A Plea for the Impersonal,” Mother Earth 2, no. 12 (February 1908): 555-562.
Eliphalet Kimball, “Civilization—Anarchy,” The Boston Investigator 35, no. 15 (August 19, 1863): 114.
Eliphalet Kimball, “Civilization—Anarchy,” The Boston Investigator 35, no. 16 (August 26, 1863): 122.
Eliphalet Kimball, “Origin of Law,” The Boston Investigator 32, no. 37 (January 14, 1863): 290.
Peter Kropotkin, “Kropotkin says, Stop the War!,” Freedom 34, no. 374 (July 1920): 44-45.
Marx Edgeworth Lazarus, “Apian Psychology and Sociology,” Harper’s New Monthly Magazine 44, no. 259 (December 1871): 118-123.
Samuel Leavitt, “Anti-Malthus,” The Phrenological Journal and Science of Health 71, no. 2 (August 1880): 72-76.
Samuel Leavitt, “Anti-Malthus—No. 2,” The Phrenological Journal and Science of Health 72, no. 1 (January 1881): 32-38.
J. William Lloyd, “Art-Love,” Liberty 4, no. 21 (May 7, 1887): 5.
J. William Lloyd, “An Object Lesson,” Liberty 3, no. 22 (February 6, 1886): 7.
Dyer D. Lum, “Cleveland’s Official View of Polygamy,” Liberty 3, no. 20 (December 26, 1885): 5.
Dyer D. Lum, “Current Literature—Analysis of Religious Belief,” The Radical Review 1, no. 2 (August 1877): 357-361.
T. F. Macdonald, “Australian and New Zealand Labor Movements,” Mother Earth 2, no. 9 (November 1907): 405-410.
Maurice, “Communism,” Freedom 32, no. 345 (February 1918): 9.
Sidney H. Morse, “An Anti-Slavery Hero,” The New England Magazine 4, no. 4 (June 1891): 486-496.
Max Nettlau, “Anarchism: Communist or Individualist?—Both,” Mother Earth 9, no. 5 (July 1914): 170-175.
Max Nettlau, “Anarchism in England Fifty Years Ago,” Liberty 15, no. 1 (February 1906): 44-51.
William Harrison Riley, “Communism vs. Commercialism,” Liberty 1, no. 3 (September 3, 1881): 3.
George Schumm, “Proudhon’s Preeminence,” Liberty 4, no. 18 (March 26, 1887): 5.
Jno. Gilmer Speed, “Anarchists in Hard Times,” The Outlook 48, no. 20 (November 11, 1893): 840-841.
Francis D. Tandy, “Economy in Library Binding,” Books 3, no. 8-9 (August-September 1893): 143.
Francis D. Tandy, Free Competition (Columbus Junction Ia.: E.H. Fulton, 1896).
Francis D. Tandy, “The Pre-Natal Culture Dogma,” The Colorado Medical Journal 3, no. 10 (October 1897): 377-381.
Francis D. Tandy, “The Question of Indexes,” The Library Journal 22, no. 2 (February 1897): 88.
Francis D. Tandy, “The Question of Indexes,” The Library Journal 22, no. 6 (June 1897): 303.
Francis D. Tandy, “The Colorado Medical Library Association, an Historical Sketch,” The Colorado Medical Journal 4, no. 5 (May 1898): 181.
Francis D. Tandy, “Some Suggestions in Regard to the Use of the Dewey Decimal Classification,” Public Libraries 4, no. 3 (March 1899): 139-141.
Francis D. Tandy, “Something about Indexing,” The Writer 10, no. 2 (February 1897): 14-15.
Francis D. Tandy, “Strikes, Trusts, Boycotts and Blacklists,” The Arena 22, no. ?? (February 1900): 194-203.
Francis D. Tandy, “Suggestions on the Index to Periodicals,” Public Libraries 1, no. 4 (August 1896): 149.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Armies that Overlap,” Liberty 6, no. 26 (March 8, 1890): 4.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Col. Ingersoll’s Words,” The Index 9, no. 482 (April 4, 1878): 165.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “An Important Work,” Liberty 9, no. 19 (January 7, 1893): 2.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Response to ‘Art-Love’,” Liberty 4, no. 21 (May 7, 1887): 5.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—I,” The Twentieth Century 12, no. 19 (May 10, 1894): 5-6.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—In England.—II,” The Twentieth Century;; 12, no. 20 (May 17, 1894): 7-8.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—Its Ideal.—III,” The Twentieth Century 12, no. 22 (May 31, 1894): 7-8.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—Ancient Co-operation.—IV,” The Twentieth Century 12, no. 23 (June 7, 1894): 7-8.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—Some Experiments.—V,” The Twentieth Century 12, no. 24 (June 14, 1894): 7-9.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—Various Schemes.—VI,” The Twentieth Century 12, no. 25 (June 21, 1894): 8-10.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—Various Schemes.—VII,” The Twentieth Century 12, no. 26 (June 28, 1894): 7-9.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—European Credit Banks.—VIII,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 1 (July 5, 1894): 7-8.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—European Credit Banks.—IX,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 2 (July 12, 1894): 7-8.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—European Credit Banks.—X,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 3 (July 19, 1894): 8-10.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—Friendly Societies.—XI,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 4 (July 26, 1894): 7-8.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—Historical Summary.—XII,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 5 (August 2, 1894): 7-9.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—A Foundation.—XIII,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 6 (August 9, 1894): 7-9.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—A Plan.—XIV,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 7 (August 16, 1894): 7-9.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—Dangers.—XV,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 8 (August 23, 1894): 7-9.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—Development.—XVI,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 9 (August 30, 1894): 8-10.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—Acquirement and Operation of Public Enterprises.—XVII,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 10 (September 6, 1894): 7-10.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—The Co-operative Commonwealth.—XVIII,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 11 (September 13, 1894): 6-8.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Co-operation.—Conclusion.—XIX,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 12 (September 20, 1894): 6-7.
James L. Walker, “Anarchy, Government, and Liberty,” Liberty 5, no. 6 (October 22, 1887): 6.
Alfred B. Westrup, Citizens’ Money, a critical analysis in the light of free trade in banking (Chicago: Mutual Bank Propaganda, 1891).
“Attempt to Kill Louise Michel,” Liberty 5, no. 14 (February 11, 1888): 1, 8.

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Archive upgrades, II

A thousand is a lot, when it is a thousand articles that have to be checked for complete citations, typos, and formatting, and assigned to enough categories and index pages to be findable. The work on cleaning up and standardizing the Libertarian Labyrinth archive has already been both a lot of work and a lot of fun. As I’ve mentioned before, much of my accumulation of texts has been done at times when there was little leisure, or too much distraction, to take as much time with them as I would have liked. So while I’ve been doing a lot of moderately tedious work making sure details are correct (and there’s still a couple more rounds to go before I can be certain that things like original formatting are all in order) I’ve also be rediscovering a lot of material that I’ve only had a chance to glance at in the past: Stephen Pearl Andrews’ temperance addresses, Hugh O. Pentecost on “mental healing,” Francis D. Tandy’s articles on librarianship and Steven T. Byington’s articles on bee-keeping, alongside more political works. This little gem from Byington is perhaps representative of the less conventional “finds:”


Altogether
To The Editor Of The Nation:
Sir: Can you, in spite of the war, find room for an appeal to the dictionaries on behalf of the word “altogether”? My complaint is that the dictionaries neglect the use of this adverb with the meaning “in all,” usually (though not invariably) with numerical statements; thus, “this makes twenty-seven books altogether”; “there is enough of it altogether to make a good dinner.” The proof that this familiar usage belongs to the compound “altogether” and not to the separated words “all together” is of various kinds: First, the traditional usage of those who have written the word in the past. Second, the two are often distinguishable in sense. Take examples from textbooks of arithmetic. “If three ladies come into the room at five minutes past four, and six at ten minutes past, and four at fifteen minutes past, how many come in altogether?” We mean the whole thirteen; “all together” would suggest the thought of those who come at the same moment. “If one boy raised ten chickens, and another boy sixteen, and another boy thirty-seven, how many did they raise altogether?” Here “all together” would give the same substantial sense, but with different syntax; “all together” would grammatically relate to the boys, “altogether” to the chickens. Third, “altogether” in this sense is never pronounced with two principal accents nor with a pause after “all” or a prolongation of that syllable. Fourth, there is not the same liberty of tmesis nor of omission of “all” that would be natural if the two words had their separate force. Fifth, if you use the adverb with the smallest numbers (which, to be sure, is not common), you say “there were only two of us altogether,” not “both together.”
Therefore, let the dictionaries take cognizance of this very common use.
Steven T. Byington
Ballard Vale, Mass., May 9

Of course, this business of discovery means that “a thousand” has a tendency to multiply. Every check or double-check for a missing reference is as likely as not to unearth a new item, or a new appearance of a known item, or some other archive-worthy material in the same volume. I think the number of articles in the archive has grown by almost twenty percent in the course of working through less than twenty percent of the existing entries. When all the entries have been worked over, there will be another logical round of follow-up, combing through those periodicals which I haven’t yet had a chance to really “mine,” and that will probably involve some more research travel in 2012.

So, the work completed tends to create more work, but I’m also getting a sense that the complete archiving of a fairly substantial group of key texts is well on its way to completion. The Tucker publications are mostly “in hand,” with the exception of The Transatlantic and The Weekly Bulletin of Newspaper and Periodical Literature, and just require a lot of transcription hours to be really usable. The major works of William B. Greene and Joshua King Ingalls, and roughly half the works of Josiah Warren are free online in one form or another (or could be with a few hours of transcription.) Mother Earth is largely available, though the various archives are all incomplete. In some ways, that’s just a drop in the bucket, even where American texts are concerned, but it’s still a pretty substantial chunk of our literary heritage preserved or preservable in our own hands. And that is heartening.

What else is in the Libertarian Labyrinth, besides bee-keeping and a lot of old mutualist texts? Here, for your amusement, is a sort of semi-random selection, the first 200+ articles that are all fitted up with metadata and have complete (or, in a few cases, nearly complete, awaiting some further research and/or travel) citations:

Leonard D. Abbott, “A Few Words about Ferdinand Earle,” Mother Earth 2, no. 8 (October 1907): 344-347.
Leonard D. Abbott, “A Priestess of Pity and of Vengeance,” Mother Earth 7, no. 7 (September 1912): 230-232.
Stephen Pearl Andrews, “Abolition Reasons against Disunion,” Young American’s Magazine of Self-Improvement 1, no. 3 (May 1847): 159-166.
Stephen Pearl Andrews, “Address by Stephen Pearl Andrews to His Fellow-Citizens on the Situation,” The Index 8, no. 39 (August 8, 1877): 377.
Stephen Pearl Andrews, H. E. Morrill, and O. Eastman, “Address Of the Southwestern Temperance Convention, to the People of the Southwestern Portion of the United States,” Journal of the American Temperance Union 1, no. 7 (July 1837): 98-99.
Stephen Pearl Andrews, “Phonotypy and Phonography, or Speech-Printing and Speech-Writing,” Young American’s Magazine of Self-Improvement 1, no. 1 (January 1847): 55-60.
Alexander Berkman, “A Greeting,” Mother Earth 1, no. 4 (June 1906): 3-6.
Peter I. Blacker, “The Perpetuity of the Union,” The Boston Investigator 26, no. 9 (June 25, 1856): 2.
Lewis H. Blair, A Standard of Value Considered in its Relation to Currency (Richmond, VA.: Everett Waddey Company, 1893).
Calvin Blanchard, A Crisis Chapter on Government (New York: Calvin Blanchard, 1865.).
George E. Bowen, “Among the Ashes,” Mother Earth 2, no. 2 (April 1907): 86-89.
Estella Bachman Brokaw, “An Afternoon Call,” The New Crusade 11, no. 3 (May 1900): 30-33.
Steven T. Byington, “Altogether,” The Nation 106, no. 2765 (June 29, 1918): 757.
Steven T. Byington, “Limiting Jurisdiction,” The Typographical Journal 21, no. 7 (October 1, 1902): 302.
Steven T. Byington, “The Number of Workers,” The Typographical Journal 21, no. 12 (December 15, 1902): 529.
Steven T. Byington, “The Union Label,” The Typographical Journal 21, no. 12 (December 15, 1902): 516.
William Henry Channing, “A Confession of Faith,” The Present 1, no. 1 (September 1843): 6-10.
Joseph Conrad. “An Anarchist,” A Set of Six (New York: Doubleday, 1908) 163-198.
Christopher Pearse Cranch, “A Prayer,” The Present 1, no. 1 (September 1843): 10.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “American Progress,” The Open Court 5, no. 41 (December 3, 1891): 3040-3042.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Anarchism and American Traditions,” Mother Earth 3, no. 10 (December 1908): ??.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Anarchism and American Traditions (conclusion),” Mother Earth 3, no. 11 (January 1909): 386-??.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “C. L. James,” Mother Earth 6, no. 5 (July 1911): 142-144.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Case of the Imprisoned Italians in Philadelphia,” Mother Earth 3, no. 8 (October 1908): 324-326.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Commune is Risen,” Mother Earth 7, no. 1 (March 1912): 10-15.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “A Correction,” Mother Earth 2, no. 10 (December 1907): 473.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Dominant Idea,” Mother Earth 5, no. 3 (May 1910): 81-87.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Dominant Idea (Conclusion),” Mother Earth 5, no. 4 (June 1910): 133-140.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Discussion at Meetings,” Mother Earth 6, no. 1 (March 1911): 23-24.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Economic Relations of Sex,” The Open Court 5, no. 11 (May 7, 1891): 2801-2802.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Economic Tendency of Freethought,” Liberty 6, no. 25 (February 15, 1890): 3-7.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Events are the True Schoolmasters,” Mother Earth 1, no. 11 (January 1907): 19-22.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Free Speech Fight in Philadelphia,” Mother Earth 4, no. 8 (October 1909): 237-239.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “A Glance at Communism,” The Twentieth Century ??, no. ?? (September 1, 1892): 10-11.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Hugh O. Pentecost,” Mother Earth 2, no. 1 (March 1907): 11-16.
Voltairine de Cleyre and Rosa Slobodinsky, “The Individualist and the Communist,” The Twentieth Century 6, no. ?? (June 18, 1891): 3-6.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “James’s Vindication of Anarchism,” Mother Earth 1, no. 7 (September 1906): 30.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Katherine Karg Harker—Obituary,” The Free Thought Magazine 14, no. 6 (June 1896): 387-389.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Kristofer Hansteen,” Mother Earth 1, no. 3 (May 1906): 52-56.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “A Lance for Anarchy,” The Open Court 5, no. ?? (September 24, 1891): 2963-2965.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Making of an Anarchist,” The Independent 55, no. 2860 (September 24, 1903): 2276-2280.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “McKinley’s Assassination from the Anarchist Standpoint,” Mother Earth 2, no. 8 (October 1907): 303-306.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Mexican Revolt,” Mother Earth 6, no. 6 (August 1911): 167-171.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Mexican Revolution,” Mother Earth 6, no. 10 (December 1911): 301-306.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Mexican Revolution (continuation),” Mother Earth 6, no. 11 (January 1912): 335-341.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Mexican Revolution (conclusion),” Mother Earth 6, no. 12 (February 1912): 374-380.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Note,” Mother Earth 5, no. 6 (August 1910): 191.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Note,” Mother Earth 5, no. 8 (October 1910): 272.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “November 11, Twenty Years Ago,” Mother Earth 2, no. 9 (November 1907): 368-374.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “On Liberty,” Mother Earth 4, no. 5 (July 1909): 151-155.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “An Open Letter,” Mother Earth 1, no. 7 (September 1906): 4-7.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Open Your Eyes,” Mother Earth 3, no. 3 (May 1908): 156-159.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Our Police Censorship,” Mother Earth 4, no. 9 (November 1909): 297-301.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Our Present Attitude,” Mother Earth 3, no. 2 (April 1908): 78-80.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Philadelphia Farce,” Mother Earth 3, no. 5 (July 1908): 217-??.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Philadelphia Strike,” Mother Earth 5, no. 1 (March 1910): 7-10.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Philosophy of Selfishness and Metaphysical Ethics,” The Open Court 5, no. 20 (July 9, 1891): 2871-2873.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Release of Michael Costello,” Mother Earth 4, no. 4 (June 1909): 125-??.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Report Concerning the Italian Prisoners in Philadelphia,” Mother Earth 3, no. 11 (January 1909): 397-??.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Report of the Work of the Chicago Mexican Liberal Defense League,” Mother Earth 7, no. 2 (April 1912): 60-??.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Reviews.—The Curse of Race Prejudice,” Mother Earth 1, no. 7 (September 1906): 34-37.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Some Questions and Criticisms,” Liberty 7, no. 4 (June 21, 1890): 5.
Benjamin Tucker, “Response to ‘Some Questions and Criticisms’,” Liberty 7, no. 4 (June 21, 1890): 5.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “A Study of the General Strike in Philadelphia,” Mother Earth 5, no. 2 (April 1910): 39-44.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “They Who Marry Do Ill,” Mother Earth 2, no. 11 (January 1908): 500-511.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Tour Impressions,” Mother Earth 5, no. 10 (December 1910): 322-325.
Emma Goldman, “A Rejoinder,” Mother Earth 5, no. 10 (December 1910): 325-328.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Tour Impressions,” Mother Earth 5, no. 11 (January 1911): 360-363.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Why I Am an Anarchist,” Mother Earth 3, no. 1 (March 1908): 16-31.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Ahasuerus,” The Open Court 8, no. 40 (October 4, 1894): 4246.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Death Shall Not Part Ye More,” The Open Court 8, no. 13 (March 29, 1894): 4026-4027.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “I Am,” The Open Court 6, no. 3 (January 21, 1892): 3118-3119.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “In Memoriam. To Gen. M. M. Trumbull,” The Open Court 7, no. 29 (July 19, 1894): 4158.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “John P. Altgeld,” The Open Court 7, no. ?? (August 24, 1893): 3782.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Life or Death,” The Open Court 6, no. 26 (June 30, 1892): 3302.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Stonehenge,” The Open Court 18, no. 11 (November 1904): 699-700.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Ut Sementem Feceris, Ita Metes,” The Open Court 4, no. 23 (July 30, 1890): 2427.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Ut Sementem Feceris, Ita Metes,” Mother Earth 1, no. 3 (May 1906): 25.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Gilded Edge of Hell,” The Boston Investigator ??, no. 25 (October 8, 1890): 2.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “She Died for Me,” The Open Court 9, no. ?? (December 26, 1895): 4756-4757.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Where the White Rose Died,” Mother Earth 3, no. 1 (March 1908): 44-48.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The White Room,” The Open Court 10, no. 24 (June 11, 1896): 4945-4946.
Elisabeth Burns Ferm, “Activity and Passivity of the Educator,” Mother Earth 2, no. 1 (March 1907): 25-36.
Jay Fox, “What’s To Be Done?,” International Wood Worker 14, no. 7 (July 1904): 311-312.
Emma Goldman, “A Letter,” Mother Earth 1, no. 4 (June 1906): 13-14.
Emma Goldman, “A New Declaration of Independence,” Mother Earth 4, no. 5 (July 1909): 137-138
Bolton Hall, “Academic Teaching,” Life 38, no. 991 (October 31, 1901): 343.
Bolton Hall, “Apples of Sodom,” The Independent 53, no. 2734 (April 25, 1901): 951.
Bolton Hall, “A Celestial Conversation,” The Public 1, no. 33 (November 19, 1898): 11-12.
Bolton Hall, “A Conservative,” The Independent 53, no. 2734 (April 25, 1901): 950.
Bolton Hall, “Declaration of Children’s Independence,” The Outlook 59, no. 7 (June 18, 1898): 431.
Bolton Hall, “The Disease of Charity,” The American Journal of Politics 4, no. 3 (March 1894): 225-232.
Bolton Hall, “A Dollar Reason,” Life 43, no. 1119 (April 7, 1904): 330.
Bolton Hall, “A Dollar Reason,” The Public 7, no. 316 (April 23, 1904): 42.
Bolton Hall, “The Effect of Taxation on Pauperism,” The Charities Review 1, no. 3 (January 1892): 115-121.
Bolton Hall, “Emerson the Anarchist,” The Arena 37, no. 209 (April 1907): 400-404.
Bolton Hall, “Failures of the Ages,” Mind 1, no. 3 (December 1897): 176.
Bolton Hall, “The Fruits of Unearned Wealth,” The Independent 53, no. 2734 (April 25, 1901): 950-951.
Bolton Hall, “The Growth of Socialism,” The Christian Union 47, no. 22 (June 3, 1893): 1067.
Bolton Hall, “Happiness and Aggression,” Liberty 11, no. 20 (February 8, 1896): 6.
Bolton Hall, “How ‘Progress’ Stopped,” The Arena 22, no. 4 (October 1899): 530-535.
Bolton Hall, “The Joy of the Working,” The Outlook 58, no. 2 (January 8, 1898): 127.
Bolton Hall, “The Land and the Mind,” Mind 5, no. 1 (October 1899): 30-33.
Bolton Hall, “Leaven: A Parable,” Twentieth Century Magazine 3, no. 15 (December 1910): 244.
Bolton Hall, “The Lords of the Air,” The Arena 21, no. 3 (March 1899): 293-295.
Bolton Hall, “Lying as a Devotion,” The Conservator 5, no. 2 (April 1894): 21.
Bolton Hall, “A Masque of Life,” The Outlook 60, no. 7 (October 15, 1898): 441-442.
Bolton Hall, “The Natural Bent,” Mind 2, no. 3 (June 1898): 143.
Bolton Hall, “The New Charity,” The Arena 16, no. 84 (November 1896): 970-973.
Bolton Hall, “Prosperity,” The Independent 53, no. 2734 (April 25, 1901): 950.
Bolton Hall, “A Reformer’s Sympathies,” The Public 7, no. 351 (December 24, 1904): 603.
Bolton Hall, “Rise and Progress of a Soul,” Mind 2, no. 6 (September 1898): 327.
Bolton Hall, “School Gardens as Object Lessons,” The Public 7, no. 362 (March 11, 1905): 783.
Bolton Hall, “Seen from Above,” Mind 4, no. 6 (September 1899): 368.
Bolton Hall, “Separate From Sinners” The Public 1, no. 52 (April 1, 1899): 9.
Bolton Hall, “The Servant Class on the Farm and in the Slums,” The Arena 20, no. 3 (September 1898): 373-377.
Bolton Hall, “A Social Arrangement,” The San Jose Letter 4, No. 26 (November 28 1896): 7.
Bolton Hall, “A Subject for ‘The Human Improvement Society’,” The Independent 53, no. 2734 (April 25, 1901): 950.
Bolton Hall, “The Taxation of Farmers,” The Christian Union 46, no. 26 (December 24, 1892): 1250.
Bolton Hall, “Their Works do Follow Them,” The Outlook 57, no. 5 (October 2, 1897): 332.
Bolton Hall, “Tolstoi’s Ideal of the True Life,” The Outlook 54, no. 24 (December 12, 1896): 1099.
Bolton Hall, “The Tree of Equity,” The Arena 16, no. 80 (July 1896): 207.
Bolton Hall, “Unsuccessful Diagnosis,” Life 52, no. 1359 (November 12, 1908): 527.
Bolton Hall. “Vacant Lot Cultivation.” Social Progress. Josiah Strong, ed. New York: Baker and Taylor, 1906. 288-289.
Bolton Hall, “Vacant-Lot Farming,” The Outlook 54, no. 13 (September 26, 1898): 578.
Bolton Hall, “A Vision of Mercy,” Mind 7, no. 1 (October 1900).
Bolton Hall, “What My Char-Woman Said to Me,” The Arena 39, no. 218 (January 1908): 68.
Bolton Hall, “The Wing of Love,” The Whim 2, no. 2 (September 1901): 118-119.
Moses Harman, “A Free Lover’s Creed,” The Free Thought Magazine 15, no. 4 (April 1897): 145-150.
Milo Hastings, “A Solution of the Housing Problem in the United States,” Journal of the American Institute of Architects 7, no. 6 (June 1919): 259-266.
May Huntley (pseudonym of Lizzie M. Holmes), “A Common Story Seldom Told,” Our New Humanity 1, no. 1 (September 1895): 65-68.
Lizzie M. Holmes, “Woman’s Future Position in the World,” The Arena 20, no. 3 (September 1898): 333-343.
Lizzie M. Holmes, “The World’s Beautiful Failures,” Mother Earth 2, no. 4 (June 1907): 184-189.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Address to Commonwealers,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 2 (July 12, 1894): 11. (poem)
Joshua King Ingalls, “A Practical Movement for Transition,” The Spirit of the Age 2, no. 13 (March 30, 1850): 202-204.
Joshua King Ingalls, “A Review: Labor and Other Capital,” Univercoelum and Spiritual Philosopher 3, no. 21 (April 21, 1849): 321-323.
Joshua King Ingalls, “A Review: Labor and Other Capital,” Univercoelum and Spiritual Philosopher 3, no. 22 (April 28, 1849): 337-339.
Joshua King Ingalls, “A Sermon, Delivered in the Universalist Church, Southold, L. I.,” Universalist Union 5, no. 41 (August 29, 1840): 641-644.
C. L. James, “A Defence of Intuitionalism,” The Index 2, no. 19 (May 13, 1871): 151.
Samuel Milton Jones, “A Plea for Simpler Living,” The Arena 29, no. 4 (April 1903): 345-348.
Gertrude B. Kelly, “A Letter of Protest,” Liberty 5, no. 1 (August 13, 1887): 7.
Harry Kelly, “A Syndicalist League,” Mother Earth 7, no. 7 (September 1917): 218-223.
Peter Kropotkin, “A Greeting,” Mother Earth 7, no. 11 (January 1913): 363.
Peter Kropotkin, “On the Present Condition of Russia,” The Outlook 58, no. 2 (January 8, 1898): 113-117.
Herman Kuehn, “The Things that are not Caesar’s,” Everybody’s Magazine 30, no. 6 (June 1914): 804-805.
 “A Carolinian” [Marx Edgeworth Lazarus], “Abolition of Slavery,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 19 (November 10, 1849): 291-293.
“A Carolinian” [Marx Edgeworth Lazarus], “Abolition of Slavery,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 20 (November 17, 1849): 308-309.
Marx Edgeworth Lazarus, “Administrative Nihilism,” The Radical Review 2, no. 13 (May 10, 1884): 4-6.
Samuel Leavitt, “A Fair Exchange No Robbery,” The Phrenological Journal and Science of Health 61, no. 6 (December 1875): 390-393.
J. William Lloyd, “Co-operative Free Money,” Liberty 6, no. 21 (April 24, 1890): 6.
J. William Lloyd, “Running as an Exercise,” Journal of Hygiene and Herald of Health 45, no. 5 (May 1895): 126-130.
J. William Lloyd, “A Race for Health,” Health 8, no. 5 (November 1899): 170-173.
J. William Lloyd, “Forced or Free—The Two Socialisms,” The Whim 2, no. 6 (January 1902): 169-174.
J. William Lloyd, “An Eaves-Dropper of Nature,” The Comrade 2, no. 2 (November 1902): 27-28.
J. William Lloyd, “Life’s Good in Evil,” Mind 15, no. 1 (January 1905): 39-41.
J. William Lloyd, “From Supremacy to Liberty and Love,” Mind 15, no. 4 (April 1905): 373-374.
J. William Lloyd, “The Enlarging of Love to Liberty,” Mind 16, no. 4 (October 1905): 898-899.
J. William Lloyd, “Courage, the Life Word,” Mind 16, no. 5 (November 1905): 1001-1002.
J. William Lloyd, “The Ethics of Sex,” To-Morrow 2, no. 6 (June 1906): 32-36.
J. William Lloyd, “Honorable War,” The Forum 54, no. 3 (September 1915): 305-312.
J. William Lloyd, “A Page of Friendly Criticism,” The Birth Control Review 2, no. 5 (June 1919): 9.
J. William Lloyd, “Moses Harman,” Liberty 7, no. 2 (April 24, 1890): 1. (poem)
J. William Lloyd, “Third Avatar of Woman,” Our New Humanity 1, no. 1 (September 1895): 64. (poem)
J. William Lloyd, “A Grandeur and a Dreaming,” The Whim 2, no. 2 (September 1901): 110. (poem)
J. William Lloyd, “An Ocean Prayer,” Free Society 10, no. 23 (June 7, 1903): 1. (poem)
London Anarchist Communist Alliance, An Anarchist Manifesto (London: London Anarchist Communist Alliance, 1895).
Dyer D. Lum, “Axioms,” The Boston Investigator 30, no. 31 (November 21, 1860): 242.
Dyer D. Lum, “The Character Spook,” The Twentieth Century ??, no. ?? (May 14, 1891): 7-8.
Dyer D. Lum, “Cure Meslier,” The Boston Investigator 27, no. 5 (May 27, 1857): 2.
Dyer D. Lum, “The First Christians,” The Boston Investigator 27, no. 36 (December 30, 1857): 1.
Dyer D. Lum, “Infidels Should Avow Their Sentiments,” The Boston Investigator 27, no. 11 (July 8, 1857): 1.
Sidney H. Morse, “About Abolishing the State,” Liberty 5, no. 1 (August 13, 1887): 6.
Sidney H. Morse, “About Abolishing the State,” Liberty 5, no. 2 (August 27, 1887): 6.
Henry Olerich, “What the American Civil War Has Not Done,” The American Journal of Politics 3, no. 6 (December 1893): 628-634.
Hugh O. Pentecost, “Is Mental Healing Scientific,” Mind 4, no. 2 (May 1899): 64-70.
Hugh O. Pentecost, “The Tyranny of Family Love,” To-Morrow 2, no. 3 (March 1906): 22-23.
Hugh O. Pentecost, “Anarchism,” Mother Earth 2, no. 2 (April 1907): 100-106.
John Franklyn Phillips, “A Railway Episode,” Mother Earth 2, no. 4 (June 1907): 194-196.
Wendell Phillips, “Abolition Reasons for Disunion,” Young American’s Magazine of Self-Improvement 1, no. 2 (March 1847): 113-120.
Ben L. Reitman, “A Visit to London,” Mother Earth 5, no. 8 (October 1910): 250-254.
Victor Robinson, “Americanism,” Mother Earth 2, no. 1 (March 1907): 24-25.
Victor Robinson, “College Education,” Mother Earth 2, no. 2 (April 1907): 72-76.
Alfred Seelye Roe, “A Sketch of the First Massachusetts Heavy Artillery,” The Melvin Memorial (Cambridge, MA: The Riverside Press, 1910). [William B. Greene]
Nathaniel G. Simonds, “A Novel Step in Business,” The Boston Investigator 32, no. 50 (April 15, 1863): 393.
Lysander Spooner, “Distressing Problems,” Liberty 1, no. 7 (October 29, 1881): 3.
Lysander Spooner, “Guiteau’s ‘Malice’,” Liberty 1, no. 10 (December 10, 1881): 2.
Lysander Spooner, “Guiteau’s ‘Devilish Depravity’,” Liberty 1, no. 11 (December 24, 1881): 2.
Lysander Spooner, “Guiteau’s Wit,” Liberty 1, no. 11 (December 24, 1881): 3.
Lysander Spooner, “Justice Gray,” Liberty 1, no. 12 (January 7, 1882): 2.
Lysander Spooner, “The Guiteau Experts,” Liberty 1, no. 12 (January 7, 1882): 2-3.
Lysander Spooner, “Andover Theological Seminary,” Liberty 1, no. 20 (May 13, 1882): 2-3.
Lysander Spooner, “War upon Superstitious Women,” Liberty 1, no. 24 (July 22, 1882): 2.
Lysander Spooner, “The Forms of Law,” Liberty 1, no. 24 (July 22, 1882): 3-4.
Lysander Spooner, “Ben Butler’s Piety,” Liberty 2, no. 8 (March 17, 1883): 3-4.
Lysander Spooner, “The Troubles of Law-Making in Massachusetts,” Liberty 2, no. 14 (October 6, 1883): 3-4.
Lysander Spooner, “The Death of Chinese Gordon,” Liberty 3, no. 7 (February 28, 1885): 4-5.
Lysander Spooner, “Elizur Wright,” Liberty 3, no. 18 (November 28, 1885): 4.
“O” (Lysander Spooner), “Coming to Its Senses,” Liberty 4, no. 3 (May 22, 1886): 5.
“O” (Lysander Spooner), “Confession of an Atrocious Crime Against the Anarchists Tried at Chicago,” Liberty 4, no. 9 (September 18, 1886): 4-5.
“O” (Lysander Spooner), “Chicago Anarchists,” Liberty 4, no. 12 (December 11, 1886): 5. Benjamin R. Tucker, “A Game That Two Can Play At,” Liberty 1, no. 14 (February 18, 1882): 2.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Our Nestor Taken From Us,” Liberty 4, no. 22 (May 28, 1887): 4-5.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “A Protest,” The Index 8, no. 418 (December 27, 1877): 621.
William Henry Van Ornum, “A Problem in Sociology,” The Arena 25, no. 1 (January 1901): 42-47.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Wheelbarrow and Land Values,” The Open Court 3, no. 80 (March 7, 1889): 1506.
James L. Walker, “A Difference of Words Only,” Liberty 5, no. 17 (March 31, 1888): 7.
James L. Walker, “A Normal Function,” Liberty 5, no. 26 (August 4, 1888): 5.
James L. Walker, “A Reason for Hanging Anarchists,” Liberty 5, no. 11 (December 31, 1887): 4.
James L. Walker, “A Southern Journalist’s Opinion,” Liberty 3, no. 19 (December 12, 1885): 5.
Peter I. Blacker and Josiah Warren, “A Brief Outline of Equitable Commerce,” The Boston Investigator 21, no. 50 (April 14, 1852): 3.
Josiah Warren, “A Letter to Louis Kossuth,” The Boston Investigator 33, no. 41 (February 17, 1864): 321. Josiah Warren and Cosmopolite, “To the Public,” Mechanics Free Press 1, no. 18 (May 10, 1828): 2.
Editor, “A Ten Thousand Dollar Prize,” ”Scientific American” 8, no. 35 (May 14, 1853): 274. [Stephen Pearl Andrews]
Editor, “An American Experience,” The Vaccination Inquirer and Health Review 1, no. 1 (April 1879): 12. [Ezra H. Heywood]

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Unfinished business of Liberty

Benjamin Tucker, like a lot of us, took on a lot of projects, not all of which came to fruition. His “Proudhon Library” and the pamphlet version of Bellegarrigue’s “Anarchy: Journal of Order” are among those announced, but never completed. In some other cases, what Tucker translated from his wide reading of libertarian literature was just the tip of the iceberg, where fascinating material was concerned.

It will take some time before anything like the “Proudhon Library” is possible, but one of the reasons for pursuing the updated Libertarian Labyrinth is precisely to pursue those kinds of projects. And some of the smaller tasks are decidedly doable. I’m working away at the remaining chapters of Bellegarrigue’s journal, and am on the track of four more “Socialistic Letters” by Ernest Lesigne. Tucker translated six of the letters, including the oft-cited discussion of “two socialisms.” I have added the first five of those to the archive, and may yet finish with the sixth tonight. All are very interesting reading. Lesigne was a consistent and articulate proponent of individualist anarchism. Look, in particular, for his predictions about the decentralization of production in the fifth letter:

During the last thirty years or more, but since Karl Marx constructed his conclusions, they have been inventing little motors, little tools which will deliver the victims of the mechanical monster; the little industry of the artisan, for a moment thrown into confusion is being reorganized; the machine is becoming democratic, portable, convenient, cheap, accessible, and shows its superiority over the monsters of the great factory in that it can wait without suffering at times when there is no work; it no longer holds the laborer at its disposition, it is becoming at the disposition of man.

In a near future all laborers, even the proletaires of today, each one by himself or in small groups of associates, will have their own machines, their own tools and the desert will be in the industrial fortresses of today, around the high chimneys extinct, between the walls become lamentable. The sons of the aristocracy of iron and silver will work for a living,—which will not be a great calamity,—and historians will relate how the industrious people recovered their liberty, compromised for an instant by the infancy of machinery and the first spread of industrialism.

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“Les Révolutions du XIXe siècle”

A lot of my work right now is sifting through archives, trying to gather together links to the works of various key socialist writers: Proudhon, Leroux, Colins, Considerant, Fourier, Briancourt, Ott, etc., etc. Some of the sifting is easy: all 47(!) volumes of the Oeuvres de Saint-Simon et d’Enfantin are available at Gallica. In other cases, it’s a matter of sorting through the rubble at Google Books. Of course, the difficulties involved mean that my searches have been a bit more inclusive than they might otherwise be, and that has paid some handsome dividends. For example:

Les Révolutions du XIXe siècle: 44 volumes of rare pamphlets from various French radical movements, 1830-1872, 43 of which are available for download (“Télécharger“) from Gallica. The material is, of course, all in French, but at least it is available. While looking for the one missing volume, I also ran across the newspaper, La Révolution démocratique et sociale (1848-9), much of which is available to download, which features an extended polemic between the editors and Proudhon, along with some interventions by Colins.

A new sidebar feature on this blog should show the most recent articles added to the Libertarian Labyrinth, which is starting to shape up fairly nicely, though there is still a lot of text-editing to do before the “grand opening” in July.

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